Books & Publications

Why Are You Here?: A Curmudgeon’s Guide to IT Interviewing

Interviewing for a new position can be insanely stressful, no matter which side of the table you’re sitting on at the time. Job interviews are part performance art, part police interrogation, and part awkward holiday dinner with dyspeptic relatives. Very few people enjoy interviews, and fewer still are trained in how to do them well. 
Interviewing often gets painfully difficult in the Information Technology field. The potential gap in knowledge and experience between applicant and reviewer makes it challenging to generate meaningful questions and to interpret arcane answers. Finding the best possible candidate for a critical role can be like dowsing for water with a blindfold and a stick – blind luck rules the process more often than skill. 
It doesn’t have to be that way. Whether you’re searching for a new position yourself or you’re stuck trying to fill a vacancy within your company, there are reliable methods for ensuring that you’ll learn exactly what you need to know about the other players in the equation before the interview is over. All it takes is some self-awareness (i.e., who you are and what you want), an understanding of the essential characteristics needed in the role, and the moral courage to ask some difficult, thought-provoking questions. 

Available in eBook format only (for now!)

High Tea Leadership: Leading IT Teams in Non-Tech Organisations

The skills, knowledge, and attributes that you need to be successful as the leader of an Information Technology team are often considerably different from the skills, knowledge, and attributes needed to excel in traditional business leadership roles. In most companies, IT is a critical catalyst for empowering the rest of the functional groups in the business to be successful. Without IT, the company can’t complete (in some cases, it can’t even function). You’d think, then, that top executives would respect and appreciate successful IT leaders. ‘Anyone that helps the rest of us keep our livelihood, the thinking ought to go, is valuable to me.’ In reality, good IT leaders are often feared, resented, and even reviled by upper management and peers alike. The arcane skills needed to understand complex modern technologies are off-putting to normal folks. The art of getting the very best results out of veteran technologists can seem counterintuitive and bizarre when compared to conventional business best-practices. In this book, Business Technology magazine’s American correspondent Keil Hubert takes a sometimes jaded and often snarky look at what it is that makes IT leaders successful in organizations that aren’t, in and of themselves, technology-focused. Drawing from three years of print and online columns and twenty five years of experience in the IT trenches, Hubert argues why it’s important to embrace failure, to put people’s growth foremost in your priorities, and to swiftly call shenanigans on improper workplace conduct.

This book is available in eBook format, hardcopy, and audiobook format.

In Bob We Trust: Lessons Learned From Terrible Bosses

It’s been said that a good leader brings out the best in people, while a great leader helps people become something greater than they’d ever imagined they could be. Bad leaders, on the other hand, are said to be nothing but trouble: mean, cruel, twisted, creatures that make the workplace a living hell for everyone. That may all be true (we think that it us) but that doesn’t mean that we can’t learn something useful from our bad bosses. ‘In Bob We Trust’ is the third collection of annotated leadership columns from Keil Hubert, the American correspondent for London-based Business Technology magazine. This book includes fully-annotated versions of thirteen wryly humourous (with a U) ‘Evil Bob’ leadership stories from Business Technology and Business Reporter online, along with in-depth lessons-learned at the end of each column regarding how to recognize, mitigate, and escape your own bad boss. Finally, in order to keep it from being too darned depressing, Keil shares an inspirational story of a really great leader – one well worth emulating – in the original script he wrote for the last speech he gave to his troops at his military retirement ceremony. Yes, you can read all of the original columns online … but the only place to read the supplementary content is here in this book. That’s got to be worth the cost of a pint, innit? Ta.

This book is available in eBook format, hardcopy, and audiobook format.

In Bob We Trust: Lessons Learned From Terrible Bosses

It’s been said that a good leader brings out the best in people, while a great leader helps people become something greater than they’d ever imagined they could be. Bad leaders, on the other hand, are said to be nothing but trouble: mean, cruel, twisted, creatures that make the workplace a living hell for everyone. That may all be true (we think that it us) but that doesn’t mean that we can’t learn something useful from our bad bosses. ‘In Bob We Trust’ is the third collection of annotated leadership columns from Keil Hubert, the American correspondent for London-based Business Technology magazine. This book includes fully-annotated versions of thirteen wryly humourous (with a U) ‘Evil Bob’ leadership stories from Business Technology and Business Reporter online, along with in-depth lessons-learned at the end of each column regarding how to recognize, mitigate, and escape your own bad boss. Finally, in order to keep it from being too darned depressing, Keil shares an inspirational story of a really great leader – one well worth emulating – in the original script he wrote for the last speech he gave to his troops at his military retirement ceremony. Yes, you can read all of the original columns online … but the only place to read the supplementary content is here in this book. That’s got to be worth the cost of a pint, innit? Ta.

This book is available in eBook format, hardcopy, and audiobook format.